The Cost of Liberty: Bail in Juvenile Court


Nineteen states and territories allow money bail in the juvenile system. This workshop will help educate participants on the findings presented in a report from the National Juvenile Defender Center - A Right to Liberty: Reforming Juvenile Money Bail. The workshop will also cover risks associated with incarceration and the consequences of money bail.

Mary Ann Scali

Executive Director, National Juvenile Defender Center

Mary Ann has been at NJDC since 2000 and has worked on juvenile indigent defense issues for over 15 years. As executive director, she oversees the delivery of juvenile defense training, facilitates and writes state assessments of juvenile indigent defense services, coordinates and participates in numerous cross-disciplinary reform efforts, and manages a variety of projects with NJDC staff. 

Prior to working at NJDC, Mary Ann was a social worker and an attorney in the juvenile division of the Office of the Public Defender in Baltimore, Maryland. After completing her undergraduate degree at the College of the Holy Cross, she spent two years teaching at a boys’ high school in Pohnpei, Micronesia. Mary Ann also worked for a year at the Jesuit Refugee Service in Rome, Italy, and spent a year teaching Baltimore City boys at the Baraka School in Nanyuki, Kenya. 

Mary Ann earned her J.D. and M.S.W. from Loyola University Chicago where she was a Civitas ChildLaw Scholar and co-founder of the Public Interest Law Reporter.

Aneesa Khan

Gault Fellow

Aneesa is the 2017-2019 Gault Fellow at NJDC, where she works on legal and policy initiatives related to juvenile defense, including reducing and eliminating racial and ethnic disparities in the juvenile legal system. Aneesa is currently leading NJDC’s Juvenile Cash Bail Reform efforts. During law school, Aneesa focused on indigent defense. She represented adults in District Court at the Maryland Office of the Public Defender through the University of Baltimore School of Law’s Criminal Practice Clinic, as well as in habeas and bail review hearings in Circuit Court through the Pretrial Justice Clinic. Additionally, she helped represent criminal defendants at the Public Defender Service for the District of Columbia, and capital defendants at the Northern Virginia Capital Defender Office.

Aneesa served as Volunteer Coordinator for the Homeless Persons Representation Project, assisting at criminal expungement clinics in Baltimore and Silver Spring, MD,  and was the 2016 recipient of their Outstanding Student Volunteer Award. Aneesa also served as President of the American Constitution Society for Law and Policy and the National Lawyers Guild student chapters, and was the 2017 recipient of the Guild’s C.B. King Award, named after a prominent civil rights activist, due to her community lawyering experience. Prior to law school, Aneesa worked as a paralegal in the Department of Justice’s Civil Rights Division where she assisted on police misconduct cases.

Aneesa graduated from American University, and received her J.D. from the University of Baltimore School of Law, where she received a Dean’s Citation for Outstanding Service.

Meghan Guevara

Vice President, Innovation & Impact

As the vice president of innovation and impact, Meghan Guevara leads PJI’s learning communities and technical assistance efforts. She has spent nearly 20 years providing training and professional development to criminal justice and human services professionals who seek to advance their work using the latest research and to improve outcomes for individuals and communities. For the past decade, Meghan has focused on local- and state-level systems change and has also worked extensively at the county level to build collaborative, data-driven justice systems. Meghan began her career as a health educator working with youth in the juvenile justice and child welfare systems. She received a Master of Public Health degree in social and behavioral sciences from Boston University.

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The Cost of Liberty: Bail in the Juvenile Court
Recorded 09/10/2019
Recorded 09/10/2019 Nineteen states and territories allow money bail in the juvenile system. This workshop will help educate participants on the findings presented in a report from the National Juvenile Defender Center - A Right to Liberty: Reforming Juvenile Money Bail. The workshop will also cover risks associated with incarceration and the consequences of money bail.